WAT MONGKUT (วัดมงกุฎ)
Wat Mongkut is located northeast of the main island. It can be found near Wat Phrao,
in a neighborhood once associated with the Brahmin community during the Ayutthaya
period. Joss sticks and scented powder were previously sold in this part of town.
However, there is no clear history about Wat Mongkut or its date of construction.  It did
not appear on Phraya Boran Rachathanin’s map of 1926.

A medium-sized Khmer prang can still be found on site. It is redented in the late-
Ayutthaya period style and includes niches in the relic chamber portion. In some sections
the decorative stucco is still well preserved. There is no trace of boundary walls or an
ubosot. Recent construction has destroyed much of the surrounding area.

Wat Mongkut is presently obscured by trees and other vegetative growth. It is tucked
between several houses and may be considered private property. It is not yet clear if the
surviving prang is protected as a historic site, but the nearby site of Wat Phrao has been
plowed under by bulldozer. A drainage trench has already been dug close to the
surviving prang. Many Muslims have moved into this area in recent years.

One plausible theory is that this temple is a more recent construction named after the
fourth king of the Chakri Dynasty (1851-1868).
Text by Ken May - April 2009
(View of the chedi of Wat Mongkut)
(South east view)
(Base of the brick chedi)
(Stucco work)
Addendum, map & photographs by Tricky Vandenberg - September 2011
Addendum

Wat Mongkut or the "Monastery of the Crown" was located off the city island in the
northern area of Ayutthaya in Khlong Sra Bua sub-district.

The monastery stood in an area called before
Thung Kaeo or "crystal field", bordered on
the west and north by
Khlong Sra Bua; on the east by Khlong Hua Ro and in the south
by
Khlong Mueang. Wat Phrao stood east of Wat Mongkut and south of Wat Tamnak.

The monastery is indicated on 1993 and 2005 Fine Arts Department (FAD) maps. The
ruins of temple are situated in Geo Coord: +14° 22' 17.67" N, +100° 34' 3.54" E.
(Redented chedi)
(Extract of a 1993 Fine Arts Department map -
Courtesy Khun Supot Prommanot, Director of the 3th
Regional Office of Fine Arts)